28 April 2022 (AGM and Presentation of Trophies)

The 2020/22 Musselburgh Camera Club season ended on 28th April 2022 with the AGM and the presentation of trophies. This season we have been presenting our meetings in a hybrid format where they are hosted at the Fisherrow Centre but broadcast live by Zoom, which has given members a choice of how to attend. Zoom has again allowed us to reach out to judges, speakers and clubs who would normally have been too far away to visit us. For example, we had another live meeting with Mölnlycke Fotoclubb in Sweden. Zoom also gave us the added bonus of being able to share some speakers with Beeslack Pencuick Camera Club. The hybrid format and remote judging meant that most competitions were still in a digital format, although this year’s Human Portrait Print Competition gave members an opportunity to practice printing and mounting. We hope club meetings will return to a more normal meeting format next season, although we will be keeping the Zoom option because of the opportunities it brings.

Members had an opportunity during the evening to suggest and vote for the topics for next year’s set subject competitions. The top results were:

  1. Castles
  2. Wildlife
  3. Landscape
  4. Black & White

The AGM finished with a presentation of trophies and medals to those present in the room and with trophies delivered to those who attended by Zoom. The full list of winners can be found on the following page:

Trophy Winners – 2021/2022

Although the AGM brings the formal 2021/22 season to an end, there will be informal meetings by Zoom every Thursday evening throughout the summer. We have also restarted our summer print exhibition in local libraries, with a schedule on the following page:

2022 Library Exhibitions

Our first meeting of the 2022/23 season will be on Thursday, 1st September 2022. We have another programme packed with local and remote speakers to look forward to. I hope to see you then.

Steven Beard

24 March 2022 (Set Subject Competition – Street Photography)

The 3rd and final part of our 2021-22 set subject competition took place on 24th March 2022 on the subject of “Street Photography”.  Elaine Gilroy had won last year’s competition and gained the right to judge this year.  After the second competition, the leader board was being lead by Joe Fowler, Mike Clark, Steven Beard and Carol Edmond.

39 images had been entered by 13 members. Elaine had researched the definition of street photography before judging.  Wikipedia defines is at “Photography conducted for art or enquiry that features unmediated chance encounters and random incidents within public places”.  Elaine noted that the genre has quite a wide definition. It doesn’t have to feature people as long as there is evidence of a story, although it is normally made outdoors in an urban environment.  There were some really interesting stories told by the photographs entered. A couple chatting on a bench. Someone lying on the sea wall next to the beach. A skateboarder caught in mid air. A man taking his dog for a walk. One striking image submitted by Kevin Johnston showed a moving car only just missing a group of people! Elaine suggested some images could be improved by cropping them to home in on one part of the story (e.g. an image with two couples who were not interacting could be improved by concentrating on one of them). Some of the images needed straightening and others contained cloning faults or dust spots that could be removed. Coloured distractions could be avoided by converting to black and white. Elaine also suggested removing some distractions, such as a bollard in the foregound.  Elaine suggested giving some of the images a clarity boost to improve their overall sharpness.    The top scorers were (in reverse order):

  • 5th place (50 points)
    • Carol Edmond
    • Ross Robertson
  • 4th place (51 points)
    • Jennifer Davidson
    • Joe Fowler
    • Mike Clark
  • 3rd place (54 points)
    • Steven Beard
  • 2nd place (55 points)
    • Gavin Marshall
  • 1st place (57 points)
    • George Todd

The top images were:

  • Niqab Lady (George Todd) – 20 points
  • Guitar Man (Steven Beard) – 19 points
  • Home Delivery (George Todd) – 19 points
  • Stranger Danger (Mike Clark) – 19 points
  • Like My Outfit (Gavin Marshall) – 19 points
  • The Shore (Jennifer Davidson) – 18 points
  • Penny for your Thoughts (Joe Fowler) – 18 points
  • Castle Combe (Steven Beard) – 18 points
  • Business is Slow (George Todd) – 18 points
  • Look He’s Reading (Carol Edmund) – 18 points
  • Oops (Gavin Marshall) – 18 points
  • Saxaphonist (Gavin Marshall) – 18 points

Well done to George Todd, who wins the right to judge next year’s competition! Special congratulations should also go to Gavin Marshall for his best competition result so far, and to new member, Ross Robertson, for being well placed in his very first competition.    When combined with the scores from the previous two competitions, the final result is:

  • 1st place
    • Steven Beard (51 + 54 = 105)
  • 2nd place
    • George Todd (47 + 57 = 104)
  • 3rd place
    • Joe Fowler (52 + 51 = 103)
  • 4th place
    • Mike Clark (51 + 51 = 102)
  • 5th place
    • Malcolm Roberts (49 + 51 = 100)
  • 6th place
    • Carol Edmond (49 + 50 = 99)
    • Jennifer Davidson (48 + 51 = 99)
    • Elaine Gilroy (47 + 56 = 103)

I was astonished to win the trophy! Well done everyone else, and thank you Elaine for judging the competition. Some members missed the beginning of this competition because of the change of hours at Fisherrow, but Elaine was kind enough to give a replay of the first 15 minutes.

See you next Thursday when we have our joint meeting with Musselburgh Art Club. We are meeting in the larger room, G6, at 7:15pm

03 February 2022 (Set Subject Competition – Travel in Scotland)

The second of our 3-part set subject competition took place this week.  The competition was judged by George Todd, who won last year’s competition.  13 members had entered 39 images altogether. The theme of “Travel in Scotland” had been interpreted fairly loosely. Some images showed beautiful Scottish landmarks or landscapes which could be reached by travelling in Scotland. A group of trees with a beautiful sky were assumed to be in Scotland. Other images showed Scottish transport, such as a road, ferry, bridge, railway station or viaduct.

George commented on the composition of each image. The landscape images were stronger when they contained three elements: an interesting foreground, a middle ground and a distant background. Some of the images were good in part but were spoiled by containing too much of a particularly uninteresting element, such as a car park or an expanse of water, grass or greenery. George suggested cropping these area to reduce their dominance and rebalance the image. Some of the images showing an empty scene would have been improved by a focal point, such as a person standing in the railway station or a boat on the water.  Images of landmarks were better if they could tell a story by including some characters, and there were some fun images of highlanders, tourists and highland cattle.

The top scorers were (in reverse order):

  • 5th place (47 points)
    • Lorraine Roberts
    • Kevin Johnston
  • 4th place (48 points)
    • George Smith
    • Jennifer Davidson
  • 3rd place (49 points)
    • Malcolm Roberts
    • Gordon Davidson
    • Carol Edmund
  • 2nd place (50 points)
    • Joe Fowler
  • 1st place (51 points)
    • Steven Beard
    • Mike Clark

The top images were:

  • Glenfinnan Viaduct (Steven Beard) – 20 points
  • Racing Along (George Smith) – 19 points
  • Bow Fiddle Rock (Mike Clark) – 18 points
  • Hebrides to Uig Ferry (Jennifer Davidson) – 17 points
  • Scotland for Ever (Joe Fowler) – 17 points
  • Scotland the Brave (Joe Fowler) – 17 points
  • Packhorse Bridge Carrbridge (Malcolm Roberts) – 17 points
  • Mystery Island Cruise (Mike Clark) – 17 points
  • Blue hour at the 3 Bridges (Gordon Davidson) – 17 points
  • Melrose Abbey (Carol Edmund) – 17 points

Steven Beard and Mike Clark have both won the right to judge next year’s competition! Well done to both. The league table after two competitions looks like this:

Joe Fowler (52 + 50 = 102)
Mike Clark (50 + 51 = 101)
Steven Beard (49 + 51 = 100)
Carol Edmund (49 + 49 = 98)
Malcolm Roberts (– + 49 = ??)
Gordon Davidson (45 + 49 = 94)
George Todd (47 + — = ??)
Lorraine Roberts (– + 47 = ??)
Kevin Johnston (– + 47 = ??)
Jennifer Davidson (45 + 48 = 93)

Joe Fowler is in the lead, but only 1 point separates the top 3 places. Entries for the final part of the competition on “Street Photography” are due on 3th March 2022.

27 January 2022 (Human Portrait Print Competition)

27th January was another milestone for Musselburgh Camera Club. We had our first true print competition for 2 years! The last time we reviewed prints at the Fisherrow Centre was for an earlier human portrait print competition on 30th January 2020. This week’s competition was judged by Gordon Scott of Mid Calder camera club. You can see some of Gordon’s work at the link below:

https://www.midcaldercameraclub.org.uk/gallery-gordonscott

This competition was more complex than previous print competitions because we were broadcasting the event to members who preferred to connect by Zoom. We set up a narrow-angle webcam which captured a view of our print stand, and Gordon wore a radio microphone. A wide-angle microphone was used to speak to the members on Zoom. The complexity of the situation lead to some technical issues, and we learned it is important to make a careful note of which microphone is which in the list that Zoom gives you. Gordon was very patient with us.

8 members had entered 24 images altogether. Gordon noted that some of the images (which showed groups of people interacting) stretched the definition of a portrait, which he expected to be of a single person.  There were photographs of people at work, people taking part in a battle re-enactment, people on the street, and images captured from a photoshoot.  John West had entered a selfie, which amused some of the audience.  Gordon commented on the location of the subject within the frame. Some images were cropped a little too tightly, for example cropping off the top of the subject’s hat. Other images seemed to have too much space on one side, or could have been angled differently to show more of an elaborate costume and less background.  Gordon pointed to distractions which could have been removed, darkened or cropped out. He also explained how the depth of field is important. In most portraits it is important to blur out the background to keep attention on the subject; with the exception of subjects who are doing a job, where it is important to be able to see what they are doing.  Some of the images were spoiled by an unfortunate pose, for example a hand which was too dominant. The final thing which separated the best images from the rest was the lighting.  Harsh lighting caused distracting shadows or bright streaks on some portraits. The very best images were captured in soft lighting. Gordon’s top 6 images (which can be seen on our Facebook page) were:

  • Kalia – Green Activist  (George Todd) – 20 points
  • Lean and Mean (Joe Fowler) – 19 points
  • MacAulay Clansman (George Todd) – 19 points
  • Fabrication Welder (Joe Fowler) – 18 points
  • Nguyet (George Todd) – 18 points
  • My Magnificent Beard (Carol Edmund) – 18 points

The top scorers were (in reverse order):

  • 4th place (47 points)
    • Jennifer Davidson
    • Mike Clark
  • 3rd place (49 points)
    • Charlie Briggs
    • Carol Edmund
  • 2nd place (52 points)
    • Joe Fowler
  • 1st place (57 points)
    • George Todd

Congratulations to George Todd, whose 3 images all made the top 6. Thank you to everyone who dusted off their printers and made the effort to enter this competition, and thank you very much to Gordon Scott for judging and putting up with our technical issues.

Next week we have the second of our set subject competitions: “Travel in Scotland”.
See you on Thursday,

Steven

20 January 2022 (Underwater Photography)

This week member Mike Clark gave us a talk on his experiences with underwater photography. Mike had given us a taster of his underwater work more than a year ago at our “International Dutch Members Evening”, which we enjoyed so much we asked him to give this full presentation. We were joined by Mike’s new fans from the Netherlands: Hans van der Boom and Denise Gielen.

Just like our previous underwater speaker, David Keep, Mike had also been inspired by watching “The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau”. Mike began the evening by showing us his equipment. Mike fits his camera into a waterproof housing which lets him operate his Nikon DSLR camera underwater. The housing has a spherical transparent outer shell which gives even wide-angle lenses a panoramic view. Cleverly placed levers and mechanisms allow Mike to operate the controls of his camera from outside the housing. The housing is fitted with two strobe lights and flotation tanks, which can be manoeuvred on flexible arms. Mike usually operates the strobe lights at less than the maximum brightness because their battery life is limited. Most of the camera’s automatic systems don’t work properly underwater, so Mike needs to adjust the settings manually. Underwater photography requires a lot of concentration, since Mike not only has to watch out for photographic opportunities and adjust his equipment, but he also needs to monitor his air, depth and diving time.

Mike went on to show us a video presentation describing different aspects of his underwater photography. Most of the photographs had been taken around the coastline of Scotland. There were impressive shots of marine wildlife: from seals and monkfish, to squid and colourful sea slugs, ending with sharks and a truly gigantic skate! There were beautiful marine landscapes with delicate anemones and fish. There were also were ship-wrecks with barnacle-encrusted, twisted metal shapes, with a ladder leading invitingly into a dark and dangerous hold from which some divers have never returned. Mike also included some of his signature images: stunning split shots showing a shark or seal underwater together with the diving boat and fellow divers. If you are interested you can see more of Mike’s work on his web site or Flickr photostream (below):

https://9-mike-clark.pixels.com/

White Tailed Sea Eagle
Mike Clark’s Flikr Photostream

Thank you very much, Mike, for preparing and giving us this presentation. It was very well received, and the Zoom chat was full of admiration for the stunning photographs shown. Best of luck with your future underwater adventures.

06 January 2022 (Set Subject Competition – Reflections)

Our first club meeting after Christmas was the first of our 3 set subject competitions: competition A on the subject of “Reflections”.  The competition was judged by Malcolm Roberts, who had won last year’s competition.

27 images had been entered by 9 members, with different techniques used to capture the reflection. There were images of reflections in lochs, harbours and rivers; and reflections in windows and shiny floors.  Jennifer Davidson had used a puddle to capture a unique reflected view of the Kelpies and Carol Edmond had captured flowers reflected in a mirror and glass table.  But perhaps the most intriguing image was John West’s photograph of a reflection in a spoon.  Malcolm awarded the highest points to the most atmospheric images taken in the best lighting and with the fewest distractions, and Mike Clark’s beautiful “Misty Morning Loch Ard” was admired by all.  Malcolm noted that some of the images had lost detail in the shadows or highlights. He also suggested cropping some images to home in on the detail, or using a different viewpoint to balance the composition (which isn’t always possible when standing on a balcony or next to water).

The top scorers were (in reverse order):

  • 5th place (47 points)
    • George Todd
  • 4th place (48 points)
    • John West
  • 3rd place (49 points)
    • Steven Beard
    • Carol Edmund
  • 2nd place (50 points)
    • Mike Clark
  • 1st place (52 points)
    • Joe Fowler

The top images were:

  • Misty Morning Loch Ard (Mike Clark) – 20 points
  • Island Reflection (Joe Fowler) – 19 points
  • Painterly Reflection (John West) – 18 points
  • Little Mandarin Duck (Joe Fowler) – 17 points
  • Disney Castle (Steven Beard) – 17 points
  • Granton Harbour (Steven Beard) – 17 points
  • Floral Reflection (Carol Edmund) – 17 points

Well done to Joe Fowler, who wins the right to judge next year’s competition.  This is the first of a 3-part competition, with the final result depending on the total score from the best 2 competitions. The observant will notice that only 1 point separates the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th places, so at this stage everybody is still in with a chance.

Please note that the image hand-in date for part 2 of this competition (on the theme of “Travel In Scotland”) is this coming Thursday, 13th January 2022. Please send your 3 JPEG images to George Todd.  Images for the final part of the competition (on the theme of “Street Photography”) are due on 3rd March 2022.

02 December 2021 (Black and White Print Competition)

Our black and white print competition took place on 2nd December 2021.  Like the colour print competition judged earlier in the year, this competition was also judged digitally. The competition was judged by Gordon McMann CAPGB of Queens Park Camera Club, Glasgow.

15 members had entered 45 images altogether. There were landscape shots, some shots of local architecture and artwork, a selection of portraits, some sporting action shots, and a few shots of flowers and wildlife.  Gordon commented on the impact and composition of each image. In some cases there was a loss of detail in the highlights or the shadows, and in other cases the dynamic range had been compressed so the image lacked contrast. Gordon recommended solving both of these problems by dodging and burning. The photographer can “paint” regions of brightness or shadow onto the image to enhance some areas and dampen others. Some of the portraits could have been improved by this method: brightening the face while darkening the light shining through a window; darkening the shadows under the chin to enhance the contrast and give the image more depth. While a lack of contrast can make an image seem flat, so can a blank background.  A portrait or flower image on a plain background can look two-dimensional. Carol Edmond’s image “Dying Roses” was an example of a background that worked. The subtle gradient of tone in the background maintained the depth in the image. Gordon also warned photographers to beware of photographing artwork, like the Kelpies, where the sky shows through the holes. If you darken the sky you need to darken everything shining through the holes as well.  Also, watch out for odd shapes at the edge of the artwork where the shadows don’t look right.  One of the most striking images in the competition was Kevin Johnson’s abstract portrait called “Neg”.  A portrait of a model with a tattoo had been boldly presented as a negative black and white image.

Gordon had classified the images into commended (16 points), highly commended (17 points) and then 1st, 2nd and 3rd. The top images were:

  • Highly commended (17 points)
    • In Control (Jennifer Davidson)
    • The Cove (Jennifer Davidson)
    • What a Scramble (Joe Fowler)
    • Nepali Priest (George Todd)
    • Dramatic Sky over East Neuk (Gordon Davidson)
    • Kelpies (Gordon Davidson)
    • Dying Roses (Carol Edmond)
  • Top 3 images
    • Watching for Danger (Charlie Briggs) – 18 points
    • Emotion 2 (Malcolm Roberts) – 19 points
    • Dreaming of Days Gone By (George Todd) – 20 points

When the points were added up, the top scorers were revealed to be (in reverse order):

  • 5th place (46 points)
    • Charlie Briggs
    • Jennifer Davidson
  • 4th place (48 points)
    • Joe Fowler
    • Mike Clark
  • 3rd place (49 points)
    • Malcolm Roberts
    • Carol Edmond
  • 2nd place (50 points)
    • Gordon Davidson
  • 1st place (52 points)
    • George Todd

Congratulations to George Todd, Gordon Davidson, Malcolm Roberts and Carol Edmund. Next week we have our second members evening, and our last meeting at Fisherrow before Christmas. Jennifer Davidson, George Todd and Gavin Marshall will be presenting their work.

See you on Thursday,

Steven

18 November 2021 (Connecting with the Coast through Photography)

This week Kim Grant visited the club virtually and gave us a Zoom talk entitled “Connecting with the Coast through Photography”. Many members were familiar with Kim’s work through her YouTube channel, where she describes her adventures as a landscape photographer and gives hints and tips for other photographers:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvkiZKobeYV4qO-KSvrL_9w

Kim also has her own web site, where you can see more of her work and find out about her training programme:

https://visualisingscotland.co.uk/

Kim began by describing her love of the Scottish landscape, which inspired her to take up photography and start her YouTube channel in 2017. She then explained how there was so much to see in the landscape even if you narrow the scope to just coastal photography. The coast can be viewed in different ways. You can take panoramic views from a clifftop. You can take wide angle views from the beach, showing the shape of the coves and rocks, or show people and activities. There are rocky beaches, sandy beaches, caves, lighthouses, coastal villages and harbours. You can take a wide angle shot showing the sweep of the landscape, or zoom in and highlight one intimate detail on the beach, such as an object washed up by the tide or the striking shapes and colours made by a group of rocks or a patch of seaweed.

Kim described how the timing and weather might dictate what kind of photographs you take. The very best time to capture a wide vista of pristine sand is when low tide happens at sunrise. The tide will have washed away all the footprints from the previous day. An early morning low tide is also the best time to find interesting objects washed up on the beach. Low tide also offers the chance to photograph rock pools and capture beautiful sunset reflections. If you stay a while after sunset you can capture lovely twilight shots during the “blue hour”. And if you are really lucky you could capture an image of the Northern Lights over the sea. Low tide is also the best time to photograph caves. High tide is the best time to photograph harbours and coves, which will be full of water, and the boats will be floating. In calm to moderate weather you can create serene, minimalist seascapes by using an ND filter and long exposures. You can also use Intentional Camera Movement (ICM) to create abstract images which enhance the colours and shapes. Kim recommended experimenting with different exposure times and amount of movement, as you will never capture the same shot twice. Bad weather brings the opportunity to photograph crashing waves and perilous scenes, contrasted with the shelter offered by a coastal village.

Kim ended the evening by showing us some of her favourite coastal shots, followed by a long question and answer session. All in all it was a very enjoyable evening, and Kim gave us all inspiration to go out and photograph the Scottish coastline.

04 November 2021 (Colour Print Competition)

Our colour print competition took place on 4th November 2021.  Since we are still in a period of hybrid meetings, with not all club members able to attend at Fisherrow and deliver prints, this competition was judged digitally. Clive Watkins, president of Irvine Camera Club, judged the competition and presented the results by Zoom.  Clive told us he had been a photographer for more than 20 years and, after being at the receiving end of judges’ comments for a few years, he decided to become a judge himself. He told us that a photograph first needs to look good and be technically well executed. But photography is a work of art, and a photograph also needs to make a statement or have an emotional impact.  You can view some of Clive’s work in the Irvine Camera club gallery or on his web site (Siglov).

16 members had entered 48 images altogether. There were wildlife images of birds, insects, a hare, and a fox. There were photographs of flowers, landscapes, sport and urban architecture and one or two portraits and still life compositions.  A popular image with the audience on the night was Carol Edmund’s lovely portrait “Stylish”.  Clive commented on the composition of each image, the shapes formed by the components, and the separation of the subject from the background.  Some of the landscape images could be improved by cropping out areas of dull lighting.  Some of the images had a large expanse of green grass in the background. He suggested reducing the contrast of the background and reducing the green saturation so that the grass didn’t detract from the main subject.  Some members had photographed their subject against a plain black background. While this helped to separate the subject technically, Clive felt that a plain background didn’t help to present a subject (and made it look cut out). He suggested choosing a background which harmonises with the subject. For example, photograph flowers against a background of greenery, and photograph nuts, cones, seeds and spices against a natural background of wood or slate.

Clive ended his presentation by taking us through his top images in reverse order, which were:

  • Following the Leader (George Todd) – 18 points
  • Poppy Girl (Gordon Davidson) – 18 points
  • Stylish (Carol Edmund) – 18 points
  • Humming Bird (George Todd) – 19 points
  • Cheeky Fox Cub (Mike Clark) – 19 points
  • Lone Tree Last Night (Mike Clark) – 19 points
  • The Race Is On (Mike Clark) – 20 points

When the points were added up, the top scorers were revealed to be (in reverse order):

  • 5th place (49 points)
    • Elaine Gilroy
    • Carol Edmund
  • 4th place (50 points)
    • Malcolm Roberts
  • 3rd place (51 points)
    • Jennifer Davidson
    • Gordon Davidson
  • 2nd place (53 points)
    • George Todd
  • 1st place (58 points)
    • Mike Clark

Congratulations to Mike Clark, who managed to secure Clive’s top image of the night and two of his second placed images, making his total just two points short of a perfect score. Congratulations also to George Todd, Jennifer Davidson and Gordon Davidson for winning silver and bronze medals.

Next week we have our first members evening. George and Joe will show some of their work, but we may have some time to fill. If you have any images you would like to show please bring them along to Fisherrow or have them ready at home if you are connecting by Zoom. Don’t forget to submit your 3 JPEG images for the “black and white print” competition this week.

See you on Thursday,

Steven

07 October 2021 (Digital Projected Images Competition)

The first major competition of the club calendar took place on 7th October 2021. Neil McGoldrick, from Hatton, Aberdeenshire, joined us via Zoom to judge our Digital Projected Images competition.  You can check out some of Neil’s work on his Flikr site: https://www.flickr.com/people/45770642@N04/

The competition almost didn’t take place as expected. We arrived at the Fisherrow Centre to discover the Wi-Fi was not working!  This is not a good thing for a hybrid meeting connected through Zoom.  After we had spent 20 minutes struggling to connect, George Todd eventually saved the day by turning his mobile phone into a Wi-Fi hot spot.

17 members had entered 54 images altogether. There were shots of wildlife, landscapes, urban architecture, portraits, men at work, flowers, and some interesting abstract and still life shots. One of these, John West’s “For Khandles”, was praised for it’s amusing and imaginative title.  Neil commented on the composition of each shot and did not like shots with too much empty space or strong background colours. There were some beautiful compositions he really liked but needed their highlight areas darkened. Some shots were not quite sharp enough where it mattered. Neil was pleased that so many members had decorated their images with a border, which helped delineate them when projected onto a screen, but he suggested that pure white is not necessarily the best colour to use. A very bright colour can draw the eye away from the centre. He suggested using a more neutral colour.  The top scorers were (in reverse order):

  • 5th place (48 points)
    • Lorraine Roberts
    • Gordon Davidson
  • 4th place (49 points)
    • Charlie Briggs
    • Gavin Marshall
    • Mike Clark
  • 3rd place (50 points)
    • Jennifer Davidson
    • Joe Fowler
  • 2nd place (51 points)
    • Malcolm Roberts
  • 1st place (55 points)
    • GeorgeTodd

The top images were:

  • Candlemakers (George Todd) – 20 points
  • Not on Speaking Terms (Charlie Briggs) – 19 points
  • Kelpies at Night (George Todd) – 18 points
  • White Tailed Sea Eagle – Catch of the Day (Mike Clark) – 18 points

Well done to George Todd for winning the competition and getting the 1st and 3rd placed images. Commiserations to Charlie Briggs and Mike Clark, who had images placed 2nd and 4th but just missed out on a medal. But your great images will still help the club in our inter-club competitions. The total scores included a lot of shots scoring 17 points.

Next week we will go through the competition images a second time, with more opportunity for feedback, comments and questions. I am away on holiday, so next week’s meeting will be hosted by George and Joe.

See you in two weeks.
Steven